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TWAK - Three-Way Amplitude Keying for Digital ITC


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Hi People,

In this thread I wanted to document and share the progress in this project I'm working on.

The idea had been discussed already in some other threads here, but in a nutshell, it goes like this:

Spirits could send us digital information, that is, made of zeros and ones, using any of our existing audio-over-noise technologies, by encoding the zeros and ones as energy bursts of two different levels.

Let me elaborate...

Imagine you have some sort of highly noisy voice communication channel. Like it used to be the case with telephone land-lines with a broken or twisted cable. You try to speak but no one can understand a word you are saying because the noise it way too loud.  One thing you could do is denoise the communication. That is what we do in normal voice communications. And that's also what we do in conventional EVP.

But the other thing you can do is, rather than trying to speak, try to encode the words in a way that is natural for a highly noisy channel.

There are many codes you can choose. For example, you can use morse code. Morse code needs three distinguishable symbols: a separator (or gap), a short mark (or dot), and long mark (or dash).  Morse code was extremely popular in the past. It made it possible for us to communicate text messages over many different channels, along short or long distances. Being successfully used on the telegraph, it made non-local communication a practical reality for the first time. The three symbols of morse code (gap, dot and dash) are combined to form letters.

And there is the modern binary (digital) code. There are two symbols: zeros and ones in binary code, unlike three as in morse code. While morse code is a varying-length encoding, meaning that different letters use different numbers of symbols (the A is dot-(gap)-dash, using 3 symbols, but the P is dot-dot-dot-dot-dot, using 9 symbols), binary-code is a fixed length encoding: 8 bits (zero or one) make a byte, and ANY letter is encoded as one byte, even if it has leading (unneeded) zeros.

In terms of the code itself, not the possible forms of transmission, Morse code is very suitable for human operated communication, while binary code is very suitable for computer operated communication, and since we are using computer software to process ITC information, is seems best (to me) to use a binary (not morse) code for digital ITC.

Besides the code (more or binary for instance), there are many ways in which you could try encode information, such as speech, in a noisy medium like the ones we use in EVP. This is called Modulation.

Modulation is the process of putting (or adding, or embedding) some information (in the form of a signal) on top of something (another signal) called the carrier. In EVP, the carrier signal is the background noise, which is sound, so it is an Analog type of carrier (there are digital carrier signals as well, for what is worth).

There are many ways to modulate over an analog signal. 
If the information we are trying to modulate is itself analog, like a sound, as in traditional EVP or Radio transmission, we have for example AM (Amplitude Modulation) or FM (Frequency modulation)

Here, however, we are trying to modulate a digital, not analog, signal. That is, the spirits would not try to "speak", as in conventional EVP, but to transmit their speech encoded in binary form. 

There are different known ways to modulate a digital signal over an analog carrier. There is, for example, ASK (Amplitud Shift Keying) which is the digital equivalent to AM. And there is FSK (Frequency Shift Keying), equivalent to FM. There is also PSK and QAM (which is a combination of two ASK signals).

ASK, Amplitude Shift Keying, is essentially based on shifting the amplitude of the carrier signal such that a digital one corresponds to a high amplitude and a digital zero corresponds to a low amplitude. In sound terms, zeros are low volume, ones are high volume.

All these modulation methods (AM,FM,ASK,FSK etc...) stand on the fact that we can generate and control to a certain extent not just the signal to modulate but also the carrier.

For example, morse code is typically transmitted using what is know as OOK: ON-OFF Keying. That is, the carrier itself is turned on or off, for a controlled period of time, in order to modulate the gap (OFF), the dot (ON for a short period) or the dash (OFF for a long period of time).  

In ITC, the carrier is a stream of noisy sound, and, as far as we can tell, spirits can barely shift the noise.  They cannot for, instance, suppress the noise below a differentiation threshold. If they could do that, they could very easily use OOK to send any digital message, whether morse code or binary.

So, how can they modulate, that is, "key in" the zeros and ones (or gaps, dots and dashes) when all they can do is barely shift the stream of noisy sound?

Going back to the broken, noisy, telephone land line of the beginning, what I would do is to just shout. That is, rather than trying to turn the carrier, the noise, off, I try to speak louder. If I get to shout louder than the background noise, then I have a form of ON-OFF Keying. 

Let me call this form of keying TWAK: Three-Way Amplitude Keying.

TWAK can be considered as a sort of modified, extended OOK. Rather than a two-level ON-OFF, we have a three-level LOW-MID-HIGH distinction.

In order for spirits to send us a binary-encoded message through TWAK, what they need to do is shift, or influence, the amplitude, or energy level, of the background one or two levels up the noise RMS (or noise volume)

Andres experiments seem to confirm that they are capable of modulating bursts of energy well above the noise background level. What they need is to be able to select two differentiable levels above.

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The previous post presented the general ideas (which as I said had already been discussed before).

In this post I'll get into some details based on a simple python code I've used to do some experiments over some of the sample files we already have.

For this I used the following sample from Andres:

 

 

The picture below is the output of my simple program over (a slice of) that sample:

image.thumb.png.1501a965cd8f5ce65aaa4aac272fa536.png

 

Green is the wave form of the sample.

The first step is to compute the envelope of the sound stream. In my code, I sliced the entire WAV file in chunks, but the envelope can be computed for the entire clip at once. The computed envelope is shown here in red. There are many ways to compute the envelope of a signal. Here I used one that works very well on conventional audio data. It does NOT work very well on the type of "TWAK" samples I imagine they would be producing, so this is just to show you the general steps of the decoding method.

The second step is to digitalize the envelope with a 3-level threshold. Anything above a certain "one-threshold" is turned into 1. Anything above a certain "zero-threshold" is turned into a 0. Anything else is turned into -1 (or whatever).

This raw digitalization of the envelope is shown in blue.

Just like morse code requires a gap to separate the dots and dashes (and a gap is the OFF in the keying), TWAK requires a low-level symbol (the -1 above) separating the other symbols (0 and 1).

Thus the next step is to extract the digits, or bit-symbols. A digit is either a zero or a one. 

Just as in morse code a gap is required as separator between dots and/or dashes, in TWAK, the "gap symbol" is also required between zeros and/or ones. 

Let me elaborate on this requirement since it is the key feature of TWAK.

Traditionally, and in most forms of digital communication (let us consider morse code as a form of digital communication since it maps letters to a combination of discrete symbols), the strategy used to distinguish one digit from the next is the use of timing: it is the duration of the symbol which let us distinguish one symbol from several consecutive but equal symbols. 

That is, transmitting the binary code 000000111 using ASK can be done with just a long signal at level 0 followed by a shorter signal at level 1. The fact that 
we are transmitting 6, not 1 zero is determined by the duration level 0 signal.

Similarly, morse code uses two durations (symbol lengths): short duration and long duration (which is 3 times the short duration). 

We could, naturally, ask the spirits to follow the existing strategies and follow some timing scheme to build the zeros and ones of a digital communication. However, for whatever reason, I imagined that for them, shifting an existing signal, specially one as chaotic as noise, but in a systematically and consistently timely manner is specially difficult. Very difficult in fact. 

Suppose I ask you to use ON-OFF keying (such as turning a flashlight on and off), to send the binary message 0000000111. How would you make sure to keep the flashlight off the time needed for 7 zeros instead of 6? 

The geniality of morse code lies in the fact that it can be transmitted via ON-OFF keying, BUT, the OFF state is just for the gap, the separator, while the significant symbols, dot and dash, use the ON state. That's why it has two, quite distinct, symbol durations, not just one. 
It's definitely far easier to keep the light on for a short or a long time, than to try to sync the time that is on in order to accommodate a varying amount of consecutive dots or dashes.

In morse code, while the light is on (no matter how long), it is either one dot, or one dash. The light off is necessarily a gap, and gaps are necessary to send the next dot or dash (in the international morse code there can be several consecutive (that is, shorter or longer) gaps, but dots and dashes are always separated by at least one gap)

So, how would you use on-off keying, a flashlight, to send 0000000111? you turn it on for both the zeros and ones, off to separate them. And you would use a short duration for zeros, a long duration for ones.

The central idea behind the Three-Way Amplitude Keying (TWAK) method presented here is to combine the on-off states with the short-long durations discussed above to provide a duration-free binary encoding.

One and only one digit, or bit-symbol (zero or one), can be transmitted at a time, as they must always be separated by the gap-symbol.

But unlike morse-code, any symbol in TWAK (gap or bit) is duration free (it doesn't matter whether is short or very long). The distinguishing factor is not the duration of the symbol but the (energy) level.

In the picture above, you can see that, according to the gating of the envelope that I've just happened to produce for this sample and with the parameters I used, there is one long, but still just one symbol at the start. 

The next step is, as I mentioned, is two collect all bit-values (0 or 1) that appear consecutively between gap-values (-1). Each such consecutive sequence of bit values is called a bit-symbol. In the example above you might count about 20 such symbols.

The next step is to coalesce all the different zeros and ones within a single bit-symbol into just one value. The current code takes the statistical mode of the sequence (which of the zeros or ones appears the most). 

In the example above and using the parameters I played with for this post, all 20 symbols reduce to just zeros since there are not enough ones between gaps.

For real applications, I need a better envelope calculations, better 3-way thresholding and smarter statistical analysis of the true value of a bit-symbol (rather than just taking the mode).

I'll be working on that soon... stay tuned.  

NOTE: It can be seen from the problem decomposition presented above that we can also use duration-based distinction between zeros and ones, just as we would with a single flashlight keeping it on for short or long periods to send a 0 or a 1.

I think we should experiment with that as well. In that case, there would be a single level thresholding, not two, and we would look at the duration of the bit-symbols rather than their statistical energy level. Short-lived energy burst (above the noise level) would be a zero. Longer-lived energy bursts would be a one.  This would be similar to the other digital-ITC experiments done by the rest of the team (Michael), except for the addition of the gap-symbol to eliminate the need for synchronization, since the duration here is only for symbol distinction, not to sync, as usual.

However,  I would be surprised to find that they can control the duration of the burst easier than its energy level. So I imagine TWAK to be far more effective.

 

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9 minutes ago, Michael Lee said:

Fernando, I like that you are thinking orthogonal to my time-based approaches. I had a dream a few days ago that someone had wrote a successful "Morse code" ITC software. My gut feeling is that spirits can manage time pretty well, but maybe Im wrong. Either way, good luck!

Interestingly, when I was writing it I sort of questioned, why would this be necessary, and why would they have any problems synchronizing.

And what I thought is that maybe, is not that THEY can't sync, is more that WE cannot sync with their sync.

I see TWAK more of  a sort of boost-trapping, intermediate technique. Sort of for internal use only. Kind of how the Scola team had their mediums. Something that might give us a text-based reliable channel that would in turn allows us to get concrete instructions on how to do the real thing. 

For example, I like your latest digital ITC far more than this, for a number of reasons, and I think we just need to tune the glory details. TWAK might give us that.

 

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This is extremely impressing Fernando! I like your integrative approach taking into account all of our previous researches.

Here are my reflections on your ideas. Due to my investigations spirits can control time and energy but not in any case. I observed time variant impulses with strong amplitudes like binary signals and pk signals with varying amplitudes. The question what way is more favorable is depending on the technology. Coherer based signals e.g. have high energy but due to the intrinsic avalanche effect they don't produce well distinguishable amplitude levels. Thus they're better for time controlled impulses.

Other more linear ITC methods generally are suffering from bad signal to noise ratio. The TWAK is overlayed by non pk noise. Basically this accouts the same for time encoded signals as well. Thus both methods are promising the same way I guess.

However the most crucial factor certainly is training for the spirits. Their natural communication form is speech. If we want them to produce digital rather than analog signals they need feedback of their outcomes.

So in my eyes we should make a decision for the most simple realization and then let it run for a very long time while scanning the output for something that would be a strong functional proof like the reception of your name 'Fernando' e.g. Your sw could scan the output automatically with ease I guess.

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Hi Andres,

One of the things that I've been considering is that, as you said, speech is the more natural form of communication for them. When developing this I used the "shout over the noisy telephone line" as an guide. 

What that means is that they could, on the one hand, still speak to us as they normally do, but, on the other hand, encode binary information in their speech. Sort of a if I said out loud zero, one, zero with my voice. Except that this is too naive. All we need is two well distinguishable symbols. 

So in a way, TWAK as I described above, is more of a particular technique out of a general strategy, which is to get them to send us binary data, not spoken words, BUT, in whatever way it is the most natural to them. 

From that point of view of this generalization, the strategy is to have them influence the noise with whatever that can be distinguished from the noise and can be distinctively classified in two separate groups (the zeros and the ones).

Two different amplitudes is one such distinction.
But the length of the "non-noise" segments can be another. 

Going back to the noise phone, I could try something like "oh" or "oooooooh"
Basically, a kind of a morse code in terms of a dot and a dash and a gap, except that the actual code is binary, dots are zero, dashes are one.

 

 

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You are right of course that the crucial factor here is getting us all on the same page. And for that, as you said, we need to let them train, and for the training to be effective they need feedback.

What can be easily done is to automatically score the output of whatever method to extract text we try (this, Michael's or the text stuff from IFRAN). Then as you say we let it run until we sound the alarm because we finally got something.
 

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A great approach to a difficult subject. I feel that this topic and Fernando's "digital ITC hypothesis" is very important especially thinking all those difficulties we have at the moment with EVP/ITC messages. If we are able to develop this kind of digital communication techniques, scientific approach and methods created/used  by "spirit scientist" might at some stage meet. However, there is so much incomprehensible and surprising  in the spirit world and how the spirits work and act, that I don't take anything for granted at the moment. I would ask for the guidance of spirits themselves in all such activities,  wait and see what happens trying to use those methods which have proved successful for now - and collect audio data - patiently.

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15 hours ago, Fernando Luis Cacciola Carballal said:

Hi Andres,

One of the things that I've been considering is that, as you said, speech is the more natural form of communication for them. When developing this I used the "shout over the noisy telephone line" as an guide. 

What that means is that they could, on the one hand, still speak to us as they normally do, but, on the other hand, encode binary information in their speech. Sort of a if I said out loud zero, one, zero with my voice. Except that this is too naive. All we need is two well distinguishable symbols. 

So in a way, TWAK as I described above, is more of a particular technique out of a general strategy, which is to get them to send us binary data, not spoken words, BUT, in whatever way it is the most natural to them. 

From that point of view of this generalization, the strategy is to have them influence the noise with whatever that can be distinguished from the noise and can be distinctively classified in two separate groups (the zeros and the ones).

Two different amplitudes is one such distinction.
But the length of the "non-noise" segments can be another. 

Going back to the noise phone, I could try something like "oh" or "oooooooh"
Basically, a kind of a morse code in terms of a dot and a dash and a gap, except that the actual code is binary, dots are zero, dashes are one.

 

 

I am experimenting with a NE55 chaos circuit. It provides almost endless parameter settings. In one of those I got a sequence that sounds like morse code. However if you listen carefully you can hear it is speech with a certain pronounciation. This is proving your theory that they basically can produce digital signals by shouting.

Here is a sample:

 

Then I got another idea after you posted the SETI paper. Isn't there already free SETI analyzing softare available for PC's? I remember that the SETI organization provides this for collaborative and distributive analysis of radio astronomy data. Has anyone evr thought about using this for ITC?

Consider that we could beat the sientists with their own weapons if we use a tool developed by scientists to prove the survival after death. Would be hard for them to turn down our evidences then, harhar!

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10 hours ago, Andres Ramos said:

This is great Fernando! It is obvious that the problem context of SETI is the same we are facing. So, do you already have an idea how to start?

Good question. I started by getting quite familiar with SETI and the parts of it that are similar to ITC

A big difference I see is that in SETI, they are mostly looking for a signal modulated over a sort of nice EM carrier. So the SNR for a SETI message is far lower than in our case. On other hand, we know that spirits are specifically talking to us humans, so we know they'll use a human language. And from what we've seen already, it is a human language that we, the listeners, are likely to be familiar with, such as English, German or Spanish.

 

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7 hours ago, GISMO5367 said:

A great approach to a difficult subject. I feel that this topic and Fernando's "digital ITC hypothesis" is very important especially thinking all those difficulties we have at the moment with EVP/ITC messages. If we are able to develop this kind of digital communication techniques, scientific approach and methods created/used  by "spirit scientist" might at some stage meet. However, there is so much incomprehensible and surprising  in the spirit world and how the spirits work and act, that I don't take anything for granted at the moment. I would ask for the guidance of spirits themselves in all such activities,  wait and see what happens trying to use those methods which have proved successful for now - and collect audio data - patiently.

Very good point. Asking for their guidance, even if just intuitively, is key.

It it also key to use the methods which have proven successful so far. That is why TWAK is designed to work on top of our current EVP approaches.

And YES, collect audio data patiently!

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2 hours ago, Andres Ramos said:

I am experimenting with a NE55 chaos circuit. It provides almost endless parameter settings. In one of those I got a sequence that sounds like morse code. However if you listen carefully you can hear it is speech with a certain pronounciation. This is proving your theory that they basically can produce digital signals by shouting.

Here is a sample:

Then I got another idea after you posted the SETI paper. Isn't there already free SETI analyzing softare available for PC's? I remember that the SETI organization provides this for collaborative and distributive analysis of radio astronomy data. Has anyone evr thought about using this for ITC?

Consider that we could beat the sientists with their own weapons if we use a tool developed by scientists to prove the survival after death. Would be hard for them to turn down our evidences then, harhar!

WOW. That clip sounds a lot like a morse-like transmission. I'll analyze with my code later this weekend to see what do I found.

I started looking for some SETI-made software we can use for ITC. I'll ley you know what I find.

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On 12/11/2021 at 8:47 PM, Fernando Luis Cacciola Carballal said:

WOW. That clip sounds a lot like a morse-like transmission. I'll analyze with my code later this weekend to see what do I found.

I started looking for some SETI-made software we can use for ITC. I'll ley you know what I find.

Due to my recherche the SETI software is no longer maintaines and it worked by downloading pre-formatted radio-astronomy data from a fileserver. Thus it will not be suitable for analyzing audio data I guess.

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Nice idea, and great discussion! I remember seeing ITC images of spirit technicians working at "computers" to collaborate with our side. These spirit computers are the intermediaries. Thus, the speaker would not have to learn this new language. The other-side computer would effect the digital-to-analog translation. 

But this presents a problem. The average person on the other side might not have access to this specialized translational etheric hardware. Unless it is so successful that it is mass produced and everyone has access. I'm not sure how that is done on the other side. I suspect it's not the same way we replicate things on this side. 

It would be better if all they had to do is speak, with all the translation done on our side. 

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23 hours ago, sglanz said:

Nice idea, and great discussion! I remember seeing ITC images of spirit technicians working at "computers" to collaborate with our side. These spirit computers are the intermediaries. Thus, the speaker would not have to learn this new language. The other-side computer would effect the digital-to-analog translation. 

But this presents a problem. The average person on the other side might not have access to this specialized translational etheric hardware. Unless it is so successful that it is mass produced and everyone has access. I'm not sure how that is done on the other side. I suspect it's not the same way we replicate things on this side. 

It would be better if all they had to do is speak, with all the translation done on our side. 

A very smart thought Steve! It raises the question how the hereafter is organized and socially structured and what their techniques are all about. Regarding the potential of realization of such a technique on our side I refer to the experiments of Harsch-Fischbach in the 80s where pk-effects were observed in floppy disks and computer text. Thus it is possible principally.

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On 12/21/2021 at 5:55 AM, sglanz said:

Nice idea, and great discussion! I remember seeing ITC images of spirit technicians working at "computers" to collaborate with our side. These spirit computers are the intermediaries. Thus, the speaker would not have to learn this new language. The other-side computer would effect the digital-to-analog translation. 

But this presents a problem. The average person on the other side might not have access to this specialized translational etheric hardware. Unless it is so successful that it is mass produced and everyone has access. I'm not sure how that is done on the other side. I suspect it's not the same way we replicate things on this side. 

It would be better if all they had to do is speak, with all the translation done on our side. 

Hi Steve,

For whatever reason, I strongly believe that for a spirit to directly interact with our physical side they need a highly specialized, very complex, biological device such as a human brain. 
OK, for a simple text message they might not something as elaborate as a brain but it would still need to be something biological and far more advanced than anything we have built so far.

What that means is that, in my humble opinion, conventional high-SNR EVP can be produced more or less by direct influence from the communicating spirit, but, for as long as there is a sufficiently strong physical medium on our side (the physical medium acting as the device). Anything more elaborated requires ethereal equipment on the other side.

There are several reports of "ITC stations", from a variety of sources (from Chico's Xavier Nosso Lar to contemporary ITC groups), but they don't seem to be ubiquitous.  I imagine ITC to be, on their side, something like the telegraph in late 18th century. 
But then, just as we progressed from the early telegraph to the modern cell phones, they can do just the same I imagine.

 

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On 12/22/2021 at 6:02 PM, sglanz said:

How does PK work on this side? And how does it work on the other side? Is it the same mechanism? 

I have no idea but I think that on our side, PK is very directly based on whatever special characteristic our hemi-ethereal bodies occasionally have and it's responsible also for physical mediumship (that is, physical mediumship and PK have a common cause)

On the other side I think that PK is the "normal action mechanism", so normal that it would NOT even be called PK.

And I think that, in a way, that "normal etheric action mechanism" on the other side, and PK on our side, are basically one and the same.

 

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On 12/9/2021 at 5:47 AM, Fernando Luis Cacciola Carballal said:

The previous post presented the general ideas (which as I said had already been discussed before).

In this post I'll get into some details based on a simple python code I've used to do some experiments over some of the sample files we already have.

For this I used the following sample from Andres:

 

 

 

The picture below is the output of my simple program over (a slice of) that sample:

image.thumb.png.1501a965cd8f5ce65aaa4aac272fa536.png

 

Green is the wave form of the sample.

The first step is to compute the envelope of the sound stream. In my code, I sliced the entire WAV file in chunks, but the envelope can be computed for the entire clip at once. The computed envelope is shown here in red. There are many ways to compute the envelope of a signal. Here I used one that works very well on conventional audio data. It does NOT work very well on the type of "TWAK" samples I imagine they would be producing, so this is just to show you the general steps of the decoding method.

The second step is to digitalize the envelope with a 3-level threshold. Anything above a certain "one-threshold" is turned into 1. Anything above a certain "zero-threshold" is turned into a 0. Anything else is turned into -1 (or whatever).

This raw digitalization of the envelope is shown in blue.

Just like morse code requires a gap to separate the dots and dashes (and a gap is the OFF in the keying), TWAK requires a low-level symbol (the -1 above) separating the other symbols (0 and 1).

Thus the next step is to extract the digits, or bit-symbols. A digit is either a zero or a one. 

Just as in morse code a gap is required as separator between dots and/or dashes, in TWAK, the "gap symbol" is also required between zeros and/or ones. 

Let me elaborate on this requirement since it is the key feature of TWAK.

Traditionally, and in most forms of digital communication (let us consider morse code as a form of digital communication since it maps letters to a combination of discrete symbols), the strategy used to distinguish one digit from the next is the use of timing: it is the duration of the symbol which let us distinguish one symbol from several consecutive but equal symbols. 

That is, transmitting the binary code 000000111 using ASK can be done with just a long signal at level 0 followed by a shorter signal at level 1. The fact that 
we are transmitting 6, not 1 zero is determined by the duration level 0 signal.

Similarly, morse code uses two durations (symbol lengths): short duration and long duration (which is 3 times the short duration). 

We could, naturally, ask the spirits to follow the existing strategies and follow some timing scheme to build the zeros and ones of a digital communication. However, for whatever reason, I imagined that for them, shifting an existing signal, specially one as chaotic as noise, but in a systematically and consistently timely manner is specially difficult. Very difficult in fact. 

Suppose I ask you to use ON-OFF keying (such as turning a flashlight on and off), to send the binary message 0000000111. How would you make sure to keep the flashlight off the time needed for 7 zeros instead of 6? 

The geniality of morse code lies in the fact that it can be transmitted via ON-OFF keying, BUT, the OFF state is just for the gap, the separator, while the significant symbols, dot and dash, use the ON state. That's why it has two, quite distinct, symbol durations, not just one. 
It's definitely far easier to keep the light on for a short or a long time, than to try to sync the time that is on in order to accommodate a varying amount of consecutive dots or dashes.

In morse code, while the light is on (no matter how long), it is either one dot, or one dash. The light off is necessarily a gap, and gaps are necessary to send the next dot or dash (in the international morse code there can be several consecutive (that is, shorter or longer) gaps, but dots and dashes are always separated by at least one gap)

So, how would you use on-off keying, a flashlight, to send 0000000111? you turn it on for both the zeros and ones, off to separate them. And you would use a short duration for zeros, a long duration for ones.

The central idea behind the Three-Way Amplitude Keying (TWAK) method presented here is to combine the on-off states with the short-long durations discussed above to provide a duration-free binary encoding.

One and only one digit, or bit-symbol (zero or one), can be transmitted at a time, as they must always be separated by the gap-symbol.

But unlike morse-code, any symbol in TWAK (gap or bit) is duration free (it doesn't matter whether is short or very long). The distinguishing factor is not the duration of the symbol but the (energy) level.

In the picture above, you can see that, according to the gating of the envelope that I've just happened to produce for this sample and with the parameters I used, there is one long, but still just one symbol at the start. 

The next step is, as I mentioned, is two collect all bit-values (0 or 1) that appear consecutively between gap-values (-1). Each such consecutive sequence of bit values is called a bit-symbol. In the example above you might count about 20 such symbols.

The next step is to coalesce all the different zeros and ones within a single bit-symbol into just one value. The current code takes the statistical mode of the sequence (which of the zeros or ones appears the most). 

In the example above and using the parameters I played with for this post, all 20 symbols reduce to just zeros since there are not enough ones between gaps.

For real applications, I need a better envelope calculations, better 3-way thresholding and smarter statistical analysis of the true value of a bit-symbol (rather than just taking the mode).

I'll be working on that soon... stay tuned.  

NOTE: It can be seen from the problem decomposition presented above that we can also use duration-based distinction between zeros and ones, just as we would with a single flashlight keeping it on for short or long periods to send a 0 or a 1.

I think we should experiment with that as well. In that case, there would be a single level thresholding, not two, and we would look at the duration of the bit-symbols rather than their statistical energy level. Short-lived energy burst (above the noise level) would be a zero. Longer-lived energy bursts would be a one.  This would be similar to the other digital-ITC experiments done by the rest of the team (Michael), except for the addition of the gap-symbol to eliminate the need for synchronization, since the duration here is only for symbol distinction, not to sync, as usual.

However,  I would be surprised to find that they can control the duration of the burst easier than its energy level. So I imagine TWAK to be far more effective.

 

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Communication with interdimensional beings or spirits of deceased humans (theoretical speculations):

SGLAZ’s  conlusion (below)  ”It would be better if all they had to do is speak, with all the translation done on our side” is very important and essential thinking ITC and EVP research work, because language in the only effective way to convey information and data which is accessible to all people. Worldwide many ITC researchers are developing more sophisticated devices in order to improve the quality of paranormal audio signals (electronic voices). At least during the last 60 yrs people have  received many EVP  messages, but most of them have been  too  indistinct and their interpretation has been  difficult and even impossible.

At the moment we don’t have effective methods to recognize individual letters in a (poor quality) paranormal voice message in order to catch the meaning of the message

In the future speech science probably brings help to this problem . Recently I found an interesting article (attached PFD document)  related to this topic ( provided by ASSAP):

 http://www.assap.ac.uk/newsite/articles/Analysing%20audio%20EVP.html

ASSAP also recommends certain software fort this purpose. -> I tried to download one of them - a free program Praat (by Paul Boersma and David Weenink),  but failed , because  my computer  (Widows 10) rejected that for safety reasons. Anyway, this program is in common use in speech science and should not cause any harm. Any solutions  or other recommendations

Anyway, computers are able to  transmit information-  voice, text and  images - using using only the numbers 0 and 1 for coding. Thus, Fernando’s TWAK- method might also be very useful when trying to interpret  audio signals and even signals we possibly one day receive from the space like in SETI-project (or ITC?). This kind of methods are much more useful when analyzing digital signals, especially audio, as compared to the practice where the investigator is only ”listening” the signal, because our brains can give us a wide variety of pranks in processing the signal our senses reach.

 

 

Analysing EVP and paranormal sound recordings.pdf

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On 12/31/2021 at 2:44 PM, Fernando Luis Cacciola Carballal said:

Hi Steve,

For whatever reason, I strongly believe that for a spirit to directly interact with our physical side they need a highly specialized, very complex, biological device such as a human brain. 
OK, for a simple text message they might not something as elaborate as a brain but it would still need to be something biological and far more advanced than anything we have built so far.

What that means is that, in my humble opinion, conventional high-SNR EVP can be produced more or less by direct influence from the communicating spirit, but, for as long as there is a sufficiently strong physical medium on our side (the physical medium acting as the device). Anything more elaborated requires ethereal equipment on the other side.

There are several reports of "ITC stations", from a variety of sources (from Chico's Xavier Nosso Lar to contemporary ITC groups), but they don't seem to be ubiquitous.  I imagine ITC to be, on their side, something like the telegraph in late 18th century. 
But then, just as we progressed from the early telegraph to the modern cell phones, they can do just the same I imagine.

 

That is all the more reason for an interdisciplinary approach to ITC. There has been much progress in understanding how the brain works, yet little of this has been applied to ITC. There are also advances in the detection and mapping of subtle body structures, which has not been applied to ITC. Some quantum physics has been applied to ITC (even among our own team here at Varanormal), but not nearly enough.  

By focusing our attention on discovering and replicating how our "biological devices" make contact, we won't' need to rely on etheric devices created by engineers on the other side. This is a worthy pursuit, in my opinion, as it puts the ball in our court where we invent, manage and control the outcome. Otherwise, we are forever dependent on mediums and chance technological developments on the other side, which so far have not proven to be consistent. 

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On 12/31/2021 at 2:49 PM, Fernando Luis Cacciola Carballal said:

I have no idea but I think that on our side, PK is very directly based on whatever special characteristic our hemi-ethereal bodies occasionally have and it's responsible also for physical mediumship (that is, physical mediumship and PK have a common cause)

On the other side I think that PK is the "normal action mechanism", so normal that it would NOT even be called PK.

And I think that, in a way, that "normal etheric action mechanism" on the other side, and PK on our side, are basically one and the same.

 

How would one go about testing your hypothesis that PK is the same on both sides, and is the sole mechanism by which etheric-physical effects are effectuated? 
What other mechanisms could be at play, on either side? 
What is the "special characteristic" of our hemi-ethereal that enables PK?
We know what PK is, but we don't know how it works. This is an essential question. 

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