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"Spica", an electronic chaos circuit


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I opened this thread because I stumbled across an interesting effect lately. It is not necessarily a paranormal effect but weird at least. I called the resulting device "Spica", a phonetic acronym for "Spirit Chaos" generator. Moreover Spica is the brightest star in the constellation Virgo.

 

By beginning of October 2021 I wanted to built a simple electronical square wave oscillator. This work was related to my ongoing research with the VISPRE. Really no big thing to realize this function by use of the NE555. This circuit is one of the most famous in the world. It is a simple and clever made timing circuit that can be utilized in monostable or astable (oscillating) mode and it was so successful that it flooded the electronic community and industry since the early 1970's in an abundance of applications. This circuit still is produced in number of about 1 billion/year(!) and there are NE555-competitions in the internet of the craziest things you can use a NE555 for.

I used this circuit in various aplications as well. Now, in October 2021 I wanted to realize this very simple square wave application with the NE555. However curiously, in my breadboard layout I made a mistake. I forgot to tie together two pins that are controlling the upper and lower trigger levels for the oscillation. It turned out that by omitting the connection between pins 2 and 6 the NE555 showed a very strange behavior I never witnessed before. Instead of emitting just one fixed frequency as I wanted it to generate and what is the only way a NE555 can work, a whole group of frequencies were generated simultaneously almost like a chord. I had implemented a potentiometer that originally just was provided to tune the frequency. Now, turning this poti made the groups of simultaneous tones jump from one configuration to another one with different compositions. Those areas were intermitted by small areas of noise.

 

Obviously the circuit was generating very complex patterns of oscillations. Because the frequencies were rather high (100KHz - 330 KHz) and only partially in the audible range I thought about converting them down to the audible range by using a binary counter stage that divided the frequencies by 2 in every stage. Because the counter has 11 stages I could tap the audio signal very comfortably at the stage where I got the best sound.

This video gives yo an impression about the oscillating patterns.

At this point I reached out for Jeff to support me with his knowledge and skills.

 

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Schematic of NE555 chaos circuit

 

955643401_Spika-555Schematic.thumb.JPG.b4f2e7fd729b53ba5db7658b2493ffad.JPG

You see how simple the circuit is, honestly much too simple to produce such complex oscillation patterns. What I found out and Jeff could confirm is that an overlaying oscillation emerged in the circuit. Something that made the whole circuit oscillate in itself. This could be proved because the oscillations only took place if the power supply was done via a radio choke. Normally no electronic engineer would do that. All power and ground connection always shall be low impedance to provide proper function but in this case the effect seemed to require instability.

Here some audio exports I could make from a bunch of recordings I made that could possibly be spirit messages. I put them here without interpretation.

 

 

 

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Jeff took the time to replicate my circuit without the binary counter and he could confirm my results. That means that this effect is not bound to some special weird environmental conditions at my place. He made the following screenshots from the oscillations.

Oscillation patterns (oscilloscope screenshots)

TEK0072.jpg.362108cd308824a329e115ffb04354b1.jpg

TEK0073.jpg.261945e5a390878e3dc98c0dbb238c0a.jpg

TEK0074.jpg.479899497d14664f735ae488ae0aadb2.jpg

TEK0076.jpg.a3df6d0d66967bf292be903797ac5b44.jpg

TEK0077.jpg.606cf44fd10d70f33132031a07394e92.jpg

 

I think you can see the principle. Basically we can observe bursts of very fast impulses packed in one "meta-impulse" that again is part of a burst of more meta-impulses that again form a package of meta-meta-impulses and so on. The analogy of self similarity and bifurcation coming from the chaos theory comes into my mind here.

 

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In order to make the chaotic behavior and the related frequency bifurcations visible I used Sonic Visualizer that Keith kindly provided in the Varanormal download section. In the following video you can see the frequencies as lines in a horizontal waterfall diagram. The amplitude of each frequency is displayed as brightness of the respective lines. During the video I slowly turned the tuning potentiometer from the right to the left.

Please see how every state of stability is characterized by a certain composition of distinct frequencies, how these compositions change abruptly and how they are separated by areas of chaos. Please also see how at certain points the frequency lines are going through bifurcations or reversly back into single frequencies.

Video: Chaos, Frequencies and Bifurcations

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  • Andres Ramos changed the title to "Spica", an electronic chaos circuit

I thought I should add some background to the replication work I did on this unusual circuit that Andres has discovered.

In the upper first two of my oscilloscope screenshots (in the series of 5) the circuit I initially used had a 35mH ferrite cored inductor feeding pin 8, with a 1uF electro bypassing it to ground - this cap is shown as 47N in Andres' cct. These two screenshots show the effect of the range of the 100K mark/space adjustment pot P1, where the top image shows the duty cycle setting at almost at maximum, and at near minimum in the 2nd image. Positive going pulses can be seen filling the 'space' part of the waveforms, in both cases.

The other screenshots below these, show true chaotic activity, and I obtained this by replacing the ferrite inductor with a non-cored version of similar inductance (a reed relay coil) and removing the bypass cap. Adjustment of the mark/space pot then allowed various complex waveforms to be generated, which didnt seem to repeat, and were fascinating to observe.

As Andes has mentioned, the waveforms I obtained were also of high frequency, occasionally breaking into an audible squeak or howl, but for the most part were inaudible, being way above hearing range. This is a fascinating circuit.

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  • 4 months later...
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Weird things are taking place. I get a stream on new ideas like an inrush since a week or so. One of them is based on a dream I had last night about the current ITC-work of Jeff. I won't go into the details because it is his work but in the dream I saw multiple signal lines with different audio signals and af transformers between them with switches. A control unit was closening and opening the switches arbitrarily and the transformers were gaining the signal difference between the respective signals. All those signals were routed to one point.

After waking up I thought about what this could mean and it reminded me of the techniques working with scrambled audio. This was a similar idea switching forth and back bewteen different audio lines however not using the audio directly but always the difference bewteen two signals.

The day before I gained some very interesting results by routing music through my LINGER circuit (documentation for this device is still an open issue). Basically the LINGER produces a special form of noise gained from LED light shining on a phototransistor with some special elements to add more dynamic and non-linearity to the signal. Basically the LED can be modulated and so I tried this yesterday with music, something I never did before and was amazed about the increased spectral richness of the resulting signal. More to this in the LINGER doc if its ready.

Maybe these findings were the trigger for me to combine both thoughts. I was thinking about a circuit that could be controlled by an external signal but instead of jumping around between speech fragments it should switch forth and back between sounds.

Curiously I was standing under the shower in the morning as I remembered the Spica circuit that was exactly doing this, jumping between different sound combinations by just gyrating a potentiometer. I quickly rebuild a Spica circuit on a breadboard. Deviating from the original design I implemented a Light-dependent resistor in the oscillation stage together with a LED. Thus the light of the LED can control the resistor value and thus the resulting oscillation pattern. The LED is driven by a preamplifier that is fed with an external audio signal from my computer (Line out).

First I used music to modulate the Spica but the results were not encouraging. Then I observed that impulses or slow signal changes made the Spica output sound more like speech. Finally I created a noise track in Audacity and rolled a 20Hz low pass filter over it. The result was a rather slow changing random signal.

525811153_20Hznoise.thumb.jpg.7d3f2e123a0461932d6bf95ced79cf8c.jpg

 

I fed this into the Spica and recorded the signal. I was amazed about the result! The signal contained lots of tones but also a continously talking froggy voice and I could copy some words directly while hearing it.

In Wavepad I slowed down the speed, added reverb, applied the "Pirate" voice effect and did a little denoisin

The result was a signal that at least I could read very easily when looping through short recording segments once or twice. There are still a lot of optimizations possible regarding the controlling 20 Hz signal, its amplitude and the proper pattern bias for the Spica.

The most intriguing finding I gained is that I focused too much on noise like most of us do. We are overseeing the importance of tones and harmonies. I think they will be the gamechanger. I must admit that Keith was the only one who always emphasized the importance of tones and harmonies and it seems he is pretty right with this assumption.

 

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This is a great discovery Andres. The processed signal is quite scary for me to listen to, and sound like a lot of voices competing with each other for the time to talk. I think what you have now is a very potent pk modulation driving engine (not modulator), which contains a strong amount of complex dynamism and spectral complexity, AND that the real pk modulation probably occurs immediately downstream of the Spica - but this is hidden in plain sight. The impulse trains are triggering pk modulation action on incident audio / tones, but only for brief intervals, as is most evident in the intial sample you posted - almost with an exponential decay, so the modulation is strong for a brief instance following each impulse, then decays quickly, so the audio quickly looses its pk modulation and becomes "ordinary" again. I have experienced this phenomenon often, and the voices try to compress their message to fit within the decay period.

Id say that this is just the start for this principle. Have you considered putting the output of the Spica into the Linger?

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Very well analyzed Jeff!

I agree with your hypothesis. While still not really knowing where the pk kicks in, from my experience I would state that it is somehow entangled to the change of the signal integrity itself. You can see it in a more simpler and abstract way like the U/I characteristics from a transistor you certainly remember very well. You change the U and get another I. The relation between the two we call a characterictic and it is descibed as a curve or maybe even a formula.

Now in this case we have an U at the input that comes through the audio jack. But the output is not an I but different categories of impulse patterns resembling sounds. Every new U creates a another sound. The interesting thing is that this is not th usual we-look-for-pk-remainders-in noise approach but the manifestation of pk-modulation in very strong audio signals. I must emphasize that the audio output is a digital signal coming out of a CMOS counter HEF4040 circuit. Previously we used to described voices in noise because noise is so fragile and basically rich in entropy and spectral composition. We don't have this here anymore. What the Spica creates is no random signal but deterministic chaos at best. The random input made from the 20Hz noise signal adds dynamism and driving energy to this circuit. So, what comes out has no relation to noise anymore and the pk effects comes in during the brutal signal transformation that bgenerates impulse patterns from voltage fluctuations.

And you are right with your analysis about the decaying pk modulation after an impulse had kicked the Spica. I observed this too in different setups earlier. Maybe also the driving impulse reflects the energy behind it because an impulse is a change too. Sometimes I think it is all about change in principle.

Regarding your idea with the linger driving the Spica, this is an excellent idea! I pondered it this morning and think this could be the base of a very powerfull standalone ITC device since the linger exactly produces the right impulses to excite the Spica. Moreover the LINGER still can be modulated. I don't want to abandon this option because I had some very impressing results with transferring music through it. Let me give you some examples I gained from it without any comments from my side.

Remark: The music contained NO singing!

First some low quality voices I gained with classical post processing.

 

 

 

 

Then I used Michael Lee's ITC-translator and got results much better compared to the upper ones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even you might not understand the message please note the clear modulation of only ONE voice without overlaying gibberish.

 

 

 

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Last night I envisioned a version of the Spica with improved characteristic and today I assembled it on a breadboard and did some tests. You remember that with my last audios Jeff already mentioned the result sounds a bit scary. Well what I got today from my experiments really was unpleasant to say the least.

In my first test run the voices were not evil yet but I got the impression that my usual accompanying spirts were panicking. I heard my name and the word "Alarm" multiple times. In the second test run the evil sounding voices appeared.

It was not only that by some reason I attracted entities that called themselves "Devils" it was even more the alienating sound of the signal itself. The chaotic mix of square wave tone and dissonances made the results very uncomfortable to hear. I give you some examples.

First test run

"Andrés, Andrés, teste Andrés!" -> "Testing Andrés"

"Alarm, Alarm, warnen wir vor den Anderen!" -> "Alert alert, we warn about the others!"

 

Second test run

Evil voice saying "Wir sind Teufel und werden von einer Feuerkette geleitet" -> "We are devils and are guided by a chain of fire"

 

Another evil voice

These incidents made me decide to not pursue the Spica design anymore. Despite the voices got better and better I have no intention to raise hell at my place. Moreover I disassembled my setup completely and I won't post the latest schematic of the Spica either. I strongly want to discourage everyone to replicate my work!

The lesson learned is, if it sounds bad it is bad.😈

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I am visualising you, your "domain" our beautiful friend Andres surrounded by the white light of divine protection.  Your hard learned lesson is for us to also learn that we are at the edge of new frontiers and should at all times give gracious thought to those who protect and guard us before opening the portals in our work for spirit.  

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Yes Andres, the voices do sound quite disturbed and troublesome. It is a good move to dismantle this gear for a while. Ive had to do this twice in my work over the last few years, and in doing so, all the projected "pressure" eased off. As Karyn said, we are working at the frontier of a new technological revolution, and it is to be expected that there will be resistance to progress being made. Malicious energies will be at work to build up forms of resistance. One good thing is they cant spread themselves too thin, so as time passes, other things / persons will take their collective attention - so please don't be disheartened, as what you've experienced wont be permanent.

I can recommend use of White Sage in cleansing your ITC work /  home environment, either by use of burning a white sage smudge stick, or by use of a good brand of incense. High frequency music can also help (such as sitar and flute).

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Thank you all for your wise words! Maybe I will give the Spica another chance later. I just try to be careful for the reasons you just mentioned. The Spica generates a very aggressive and dissonant sound that bites your ears. That could add up to the negative implications I observed. I'm thinking of another device that uses harmonic sounds rather.

Thanks Karyn for your imagination of my home. I feel the same basically. By the time I learned to imagine 'protection spheres' that are enclosing me and my wife to shield us against negative energy. In case of emergency this helps a lot.

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Following your encouraging advices I made another approach with the SpiCa. I cannibalized an existing device that conatins the SpiCa circuit that works pretty good and threw away all the stuff I don't needed. Then I added the latest design ideas and I came up with a new SpiCa v2.0 which I am now exploring. See and hear my proceeding in this little video I made. The Spica is  delivering the sound for the video through the Lingua speech processor.

SpiCa Proceedings

 

 

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1557573013_Unbenannt7.jpg.f2b303b410d3f9bfa5d4a8304dd1387a.jpg

Another test from today was awesome. I explored the endless configuration possibilities of the device that are greatly expamded by the use of arbitrary audio material to modulate the SpiCa. I found out that adding reverb to the output the Lingua generates and the "willow" voice effect makes the voices more clear. An angel like voice that came out as a result as someone tries to speak very slowly and clearly pronounced.

 

 

 

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Hi Andres,

I had my JPS unit out, so thought Id put your latest sound file through it and see what happens. Well, firstly, the JPS didnt like the extreme dynamic range of the SPICA, so I put it through several compression loops of 3:1 , and that made it palatable. Also reduced pitch by 30%. The voice content is very harsh and strong, and is a little clearer with the JPS. I have added a sound clip of what I got.

I cant help thinking there is more to discover here. My mind goes back to your VISPRE unit, and in particular, the pulse generator, as it has parallels with the digital ouput of the SPICA. I was wondering if such a waveform could simply gate a source of scrambled audio, which is the fed into the Lingua?

 

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I was amazed about the quality you could squeeze out from my audio, Jeff! It seems in general it's a low whispering male voice interspersed with sighs and moans. I could extract some very clear messages.

"Ein neuer Held" -> "A new hero":

"Ich bin immer da" -> "I am always here":

"Brauchen nun Tage" -> "Now we will need some days":

"We're all that bad":

"We're back":

 

Regarding your idea, you had the right thoughts. However the SpiCa will not be a good source for gating scrambled audio. What you heard is the SpiCa signal after Lingua processing. The raw signal is a semi-chaotic mixture of tones and thus not suitable for gating because the amplitude is more or less constant. But I have another idea I will follow later.

Basically the LINGER would be more suitable for gating scrambled noise because it produces noise bursts in the rythm of speech. The signal would just needed to be demodulated to extract the envelope and then control a noise gate for scrambled audio.

I'm pondering to simulate this process in WavePad before realizing it in hardware because it provides a noise gate function.

Your contribution to this topic was very valiuable, Jeff! It reminds me to set up the JPS I own which I haven't found the time for actually.

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On 3/14/2022 at 12:35 PM, Andres Ramos said:

Weird things are taking place. I get a stream on new ideas like an inrush since a week or so. One of them is based on a dream I had last night about the current ITC-work of Jeff. I won't go into the details because it is his work but in the dream I saw multiple signal lines with different audio signals and af transformers between them with switches. A control unit was closening and opening the switches arbitrarily and the transformers were gaining the signal difference between the respective signals. All those signals were routed to one point.

After waking up I thought about what this could mean and it reminded me of the techniques working with scrambled audio. This was a similar idea switching forth and back bewteen different audio lines however not using the audio directly but always the difference bewteen two signals.

The day before I gained some very interesting results by routing music through my LINGER circuit (documentation for this device is still an open issue). Basically the LINGER produces a special form of noise gained from LED light shining on a phototransistor with some special elements to add more dynamic and non-linearity to the signal. Basically the LED can be modulated and so I tried this yesterday with music, something I never did before and was amazed about the increased spectral richness of the resulting signal. More to this in the LINGER doc if its ready.

Maybe these findings were the trigger for me to combine both thoughts. I was thinking about a circuit that could be controlled by an external signal but instead of jumping around between speech fragments it should switch forth and back between sounds.

Curiously I was standing under the shower in the morning as I remembered the Spica circuit that was exactly doing this, jumping between different sound combinations by just gyrating a potentiometer. I quickly rebuild a Spica circuit on a breadboard. Deviating from the original design I implemented a Light-dependent resistor in the oscillation stage together with a LED. Thus the light of the LED can control the resistor value and thus the resulting oscillation pattern. The LED is driven by a preamplifier that is fed with an external audio signal from my computer (Line out).

First I used music to modulate the Spica but the results were not encouraging. Then I observed that impulses or slow signal changes made the Spica output sound more like speech. Finally I created a noise track in Audacity and rolled a 20Hz low pass filter over it. The result was a rather slow changing random signal.

525811153_20Hznoise.thumb.jpg.7d3f2e123a0461932d6bf95ced79cf8c.jpg

 

I fed this into the Spica and recorded the signal. I was amazed about the result! The signal contained lots of tones but also a continously talking froggy voice and I could copy some words directly while hearing it.

 

In Wavepad I slowed down the speed, added reverb, applied the "Pirate" voice effect and did a little denoisin

The result was a signal that at least I could read very easily when looping through short recording segments once or twice. There are still a lot of optimizations possible regarding the controlling 20 Hz signal, its amplitude and the proper pattern bias for the Spica.

The most intriguing finding I gained is that I focused too much on noise like most of us do. We are overseeing the importance of tones and harmonies. I think they will be the gamechanger. I must admit that Keith was the only one who always emphasized the importance of tones and harmonies and it seems he is pretty right with this assumption.

 

 

sounds like a wobble function!

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Currently I am trying to use the Speech impulses from the LINGER to control the SpiCa circuit. I am testing a new demodulation method to get rid of tones that are not carrying pk modulation. This is actually more a study instead of a working device. What is very interesting is that I can produce some fragments of a human voice. In the present configuration the device produces more or less the vocals "a" and "o" together with some consonants. In sum the voice sounds like a howling lunatic 😁

This tells me that basically the device can produce a voice that can be controlled by random impulses.

Here are some excerpts gained from different settings. Post processing was just reverb (on sequence 3), high pass filtering and slowing the audio down to 40%.

Vocal sequence-1:

Vocal sequence-2:

Vocal sequence-3:

 

And here is a sequence of a slow speaking voice. The result is amazing so far because I did no language processing with Lingua, Krisp or itc-translator. I applied just reverb, speed slow down and high pass filtering.

 

 

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Hi Andres, is there a way to limit the range in which the tone varies? For example, to first keep it between 80-400hz to get closer to human speech patterns.

I presume we're not able to input a sound sample and the randomness of the circuit determines the tone?

Good stuff. imagine if you had 7 of these devices running in parallel...each limiting its fundamental or harmonic base tone to stay within the defined range.

 

For example:

Fundamental 100-200Hz

1st Harmonic 200-300Hz

2nd harmonics 300-400Hz

The spacing between the tones is anywhere from 1-100Hz with no overlap.

Just thinking out loud of ways to modify this to keep freqs within typical human voice range 

Great experiment!

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1 hour ago, Keith J. Clark said:

Hi Andres, is there a way to limit the range in which the tone varies? For example, to first keep it between 80-400hz to get closer to human speech patterns.

I presume we're not able to input a sound sample and the randomness of the circuit determines the tone?

Good stuff. imagine if you had 7 of these devices running in parallel...each limiting its fundamental or harmonic base tone to stay within the defined range.

 

For example:

Fundamental 100-200Hz

1st Harmonic 200-300Hz

2nd harmonics 300-400Hz

The spacing between the tones is anywhere from 1-100Hz with no overlap.

Just thinking out loud of ways to modify this to keep freqs within typical human voice range 

Great experiment!

I see your idea Keith. Basically the area of tone changes can be narrowed down to a smaller range. However the problem is that the SpiCa unit is not a standard sweeping audio generator. Instead of linearly sweeping a tone over a specified range it rather sweeps across a range made from different tone combinations with some linear sweep in-between. During the sweep the SpiCa instantly jumps from one chord or tone combination to another one.

What you proposed would rather be system of linear sweeping audio generators tuned to different frequency bands and every generator controlled by its own speech pattern generator. This is an easy design of equally made but differently tuned modules. Just a lot of work because you need some of them but no problem technically. In fact this design would share some functions with the Spiricom.

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The rest of my results from tonight.

A scary sounding cacophony. I heard many negative utterances from this voice. Later the spirit talked about being condemned, suffering, dead corpses and paying.

 

Talks about three corpses and payment (German)

 

Du bist 60 -> You are 60 years old (I'm almost 59 actually)

 

Das täuscht -> This is deceptive

 

Singing spirit(like indian natives)

 

 

 

 

 

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lol, these sounds are so freakish I suggest you keep the recordings in a separate folder - in case one day we can use them for videos!

I still hold firm to the idea that the noise dictates our response. I've grown accustomed to any voice and whenever I think I hear something negative I realize Im emotionally involved, then I pull back to an objective state. There are times where some tones have the ability to cause panic attacks for those sensitive, like you and me. I just experienced that the other night. so I changed the tone.

the second, 4th, and 5th samples seem to hold the most promise

 

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10 hours ago, Keith J. Clark said:

lol, these sounds are so freakish I suggest you keep the recordings in a separate folder - in case one day we can use them for videos!

I still hold firm to the idea that the noise dictates our response. I've grown accustomed to any voice and whenever I think I hear something negative I realize Im emotionally involved, then I pull back to an objective state. There are times where some tones have the ability to cause panic attacks for those sensitive, like you and me. I just experienced that the other night. so I changed the tone.

the second, 4th, and 5th samples seem to hold the most promise

 

Yeah that's true. However this time I got no panic, I just felt compassion for those beings in the hereafter who are suffering from their own demons they created and I instantly felt obliged to pray for them.

I think that harmonic tones are attracting positive entities and disharmonic ones rather negative ones. It's all about tuning and maybe a feedback process from our own soul tjat also changes due to the sounds it perceives.

I have a backup program that saves all my project files in my STRATO cloud drive every day. Thus the files are backuped.

Today I will try some more optimizations.

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I disagree. I feel that our response to disharmonic tones is a conditioned learned behavior. Though I'm sure it appears as either constructive or destructive on the atomic level.

just saying my own individual experience is that when negative is discarded.....it is unable to exist because it isn't being acknowledged, therefore not given any power in our minds. and since our minds create thoughts, and thoughts are physical form.....well, you see where Im going with this 🙂
 

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Maybe you're right. I remember many years ago when I was married with my first wife she took me to an opera performance from Arnold Schönberg's "Moses and Aaron", a composition based on the 12-tone system. In my ears it was full of dissonance but it was valued as deep spiritual music.

Maybe what is negative is not the sound but our negative reaction, as you said.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/30/2022 at 5:28 PM, Andres Ramos said:

Hello André, personally, I don't hear the same thing as you. What I hear is in French, certainly that's part of the game. 😉🙂

"Ein neuer Held" -> "La liberté - Freedom":

 

"Ich bin immer da" -> "Est-ce que tu m'entends? - Do you hear me?":

 

"Brauchen nun Tage" -> "S'il vous plaît - Please":

 

"C'est l'inspecteur - It's the inspector ":

 

"We're back": Ici je ne comprends pas - Here I don't understand

 

 

Regarding your idea, you had the right thoughts. However the SpiCa will not be a good source for gating scrambled audio. What you heard is the SpiCa signal after Lingua processing. The raw signal is a semi-chaotic mixture of tones and thus not suitable for gating because the amplitude is more or less constant. But I have another idea I will follow later.

Basically the LINGER would be more suitable for gating scrambled noise because it produces noise bursts in the rythm of speech. The signal would just needed to be demodulated to extract the envelope and then control a noise gate for scrambled audio.

I'm pondering to simulate this process in WavePad before realizing it in hardware because it provides a noise gate function.

Your contribution to this topic was very valiuable, Jeff! It reminds me to set up the JPS I own which I haven't found the time for actually.

 

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