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7 - ITC Plasma Voice Receiver - by Andrés Ramos


Andres Ramos
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1. Abstract

Following my experiments with the RS-FlipFlop EVP receiver I was looking for other setups that would generate impulse encoded spirit speech patterns as well, as I stumbled across this YT video. The guy in the video used a neon lamp to generate rhythmic sound patterns. As i heard these sounds my ears grew because i recognized speech patterns.

The physics of a neon bulb is not hard to understand. It is a gas discharge lamp that is very well explained here. The neon bulb or neon lamp contains rarified neon gas and also other gases in a glas cylinder. By applying a voltage the lamp starts to glow. The working principle is based on electrons emitted from the cathode that become accelerated by the electric field of the voltage. As the electrons make their way through the space between the electrodes they gain speed and energy. Since the electrons don't move through empty space but through rarified gas they'll hit a gas molecule after a while. The molecule takes the kinetic energy from the electron, i.e. the outer electrons in the molecule move up to a higher level.  Because the molecule tends to get back into a stable state the energy is now emitted as photons. This is the light we see. Because ionized gas is called "plasma" I used this term for my receiver.

Every electron hit cause a small current impulse. If the current goes through an af transformer it can be heard as a crackling spark sound, similar to a radioactive counter. The interesting thing about this effect is that electrons are emitted from the cathode when a certain voltage is reached and the electron emission, acceleration and gas molecule impact is a nonlinear avalanche effect. My idea was to raise the voltage just up to this critical level so that a small spirit impact would kick off the avalanche effect. In short words the spirits would trigger the impulses.

2. Electronic schematic of neon bulb receiver

Neon Bulb EVP Receiver.JPG

 

The electronic was a bit of a challenge. As already explained in the abstract I needed an adjustable driving voltage for the neon lamp. The problem is that neon bulbs start to work between 90V and 120V, not really a voltage you can get in a battery. The solution was a relaxation oscillator with the transformer, TR1 and the components R3, R2, D2 and C5. The oscillator generates a high ac voltage up to 150V that gets rectified by D2 and charging C5. The voltage at C2 is routed via a potentiometer and the primary winding of TR2 to the neon lamp. The potentiometer limits the current ans helps to tune the neon lamp near the avalanche start. The crossover switch S1a/b is a bit of a special gimick. If you run a neon lamp permanently on dc voltage a degradation of the cathode is taking place. This phenomenon is called "cathode sputtering" . Every electron leaving the cathode takes a little of the cathode material with it and layers it over the anode. Thus by the time the cathode shrinks and the anode grows. In normal applications this is no problem since the neon lamp is operated with ac voltage and not dc. In my device I simply put in a crossover switch that should be actuated from time to time to reverse the sputtering process.

A word regarding the neon lamp. Neon lamps are used abundantly in many applications. For examplesome screwdriver contain a neon lamp for the technicians to check if power supply outlets are carrying voltage. For my design I used a "flickering candle light effect" lamp. Its electrodes are not small wires but bigger surfaces. That gives the discharge streamers more opportunities to spread and this provokes impulses, an ideal configuration for ITC.

3. Mechanical Assembly

Without my deliberate intention, the receiver design resembled a steampunk machine. I used an aluminum profile as a heat sink for the transistor. However in the end it turned out thet the BUT12 was switching so fast that it hardly generated any heat.

ITC Plasma Voice Receiver complete device

Neon-1.jpg

 

Electronic module and cables

Neon-2.jpg

 

The Neon Bulb in Action

Neon-3.jpg

 

4. Test results

The experiments with this device were amazing. A lot of good voice samples and some strange anomalies occurred during the tests. The basic signal characteristic is shown in the picture below.

Signal characteristic of plasma voice receiver

Patterns.jpg

The impulses are very short and were meeting my expectations so far of a signal characteristic that is dominated by avalanche effects. The impulse levels are varying. This is a clear advantage compared to the RS flipflop where the impulse levels are constant more or less. Varying levels means better modulation possibilities.

Zoomed representation of impulses

Impulses.jpg

As I started my tests it appeared to me as if the spirits were surprised. It seemed they immediatly started testing the device with the typical sentence "Eins, Zwei, Drei.." what means "one, two, three,.." in English.

"Eins, Zwei, Drei"

Moreover I ecountered some anomalies. On one sequence I got a sound like an old rotary dial jack as it was used in old analog telephone systems. Dial Sequence

Another attitude I observed was the tendency to emit sudden low frequency oscillations like these.

And another strange encounter that I was facing was a a remarkable hollow sound, very faintly here. Apart from the fact that the sound was rendering a flying by UFO there was another thing that thrilled me. I had heard this sound before! Approximately ten years ago, before I became spiritual and before I was enlisting for ITC I was experimenting with modulated light. To put it simply I developed a simple light microphone with an photo transistor. I installed it in my car and was driving around while recording all the sounds of street lamps, neon lights, CFL's, headlights of cars a.s.o. In one of those recordings i catched the same hollow sound. For comparison you can hear here the old recording.  Both sounds just differ in pitch but not in the general characteristic. Thus I already caught my first ITC recording 10 years ago or both recordings are something else not related to ITC. Who knows?

A complete gallery of all sound samples can be found here.

The sound of the voices is rather deep and distorted but most amazingly noise free. At the time I tested my design I used audacity denoising to convert impulses in more intelligible sound. I didn't know yet that Paulstretch was a better way to achieve this goal as denoising is. This is the reason why I want to run another test sequence in the future with Paulstretch signal processing.

In a final evaluation it can be determined that the generation of spirit impulses by use of a neon bulb has lots of potential. Two weeks ago I have tried something with a very simple technique. I took a piece of plastic foil and crumpled it gently with my fingers. After recording the sound I almost found an ideal configuration of impulses in terms of frequency, pulse width and level that could be very well transformed with Paultretch. The impulses from the neon bulb are very similar to then one gained with plastic foil. The impulses are less "harder" in sound compared to the RS-Flipflop and timing and rhythm are very near to human speech. I think there is still unduscovered potential in this fascinationg steampunk-like technique.

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