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Article about "Spiritual Technology" based on the works of Rudolf Steiner


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  • iDigitalMedium Research Team

This is an article from the magazine "Jupiter" from 2012, issued by the astronomical and mathematical section of the Goetheanum in Dornach/Switzerland, the central of the society for Antrophosophy. 

The article from Linus Feiten describes machines and other technologies working with spiritual forces and discusses Steiner's explanations as well as giving an outview on the further development path of technology itself without moral. The latter part especially discusses another article from Paul Emberson who had a very negative vision about the future of technology.

 

 

Technology_Emberson_Steiner_MathAstroSection.pdf

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Thank you Andres for sharing this.  Steiner influenced a lot of my developing thoughts for a time.  My daughter started school at a Steiner School but unfortunately was too advanced to continue within their program.  She became frustrated with being held back in her learning - her mothers fault entirely.  She was academically hungry well before school was on the horizon something I encouraged.  Poor independent student learning plans set her up to be frustrated so it was easier on her to move to an environment that was challenging in the way she responded.

We did however follow biodynamic agriculture with our home garden and were rewarded with delicious, non chemical foods as best as one can in a rural area that sprayed everything, everywhere.  She drew the line at manual removal of grubs and quite happily "solved that problem" with chickens running around the garden but separated from the vegetables so for pest control they were happy chickens.  I still got the job of manual removal but no longer the waste or numbers.

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  • iDigitalMedium Research Team

Thanks Karyn. I always wonder that Steiner still is so popular outside germany and Switzerland  where he had put the focus of his work. On telegram I found a group that just came together  of young british people studying  Steiners books. Seems you already realized some if hus ideas regarding farming and nutrition. I was deeply entangled  with anthroposophy more than a decade and my first wife and father in law were strongly engaged in the anthroposophy community.  Sadly in that time I wasn’t  able to adopt Steiners teachings even I tried hard. I guess it somehow was above my horizon but I still value his work as groundbreaking.

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Yes, Andres, the man was beyond brilliant and quite productive over a range of subjects. Sadly our Steiner school has closed, and the people most interested possibly still meet to discuss his works. I have yet to go through all those things I kept of Emma's first years to renew my love for the time she did spend there, but sometimes it is best not to poke the dragon until the right time. It still feels as if yesterday she transitioned sometimes.  He also was gifted with mediumship.

Yes, we were avid gardeners, and I think our neighbours thought us mad gardening by the moon and using the preps. We had a hilarious weekend once with a lot of people coming together for prep time.  I cannot remember whether we were filling the horns or taking them up, well to non-farmer us, and my daughter more so was appalled at the rats but even more, so the farmer's son was chasing them and killing them and enjoying doing so. Emma was beside herself, and more than one conversation was had about the blood spilt on such a sacred moment.  

I must explain she was a vegetarian from the first time I introduced meat to her. No matter how shredded, minced I presented it, she would spit it out and not just spit, but with such force, one could say it was a projectile outwards. Yukky was all she would say; of course, at that time, she had a little vocabulary. As she got older and I unawares kept trying, she would say she did not like the taste, feeling, texture and never did eat fish or meat. Then when she was older again, it was the killing that she objected to. Back to gardening, so long as the grubs went to the chickens, she was okay with it, but killing the grubs for the sake of our food, there was a division. The chickens it was their food and part of their natural food chain.

Interestingly she also hated cut flowers. She would not offend the person; I remember once a little boy gave her a flower. She put it in her bag and said thank you, and as soon as she got home, I am sure she gave the flower an obituary before committing it to the bin. She was very opposed because someone kills a beautiful thing for our momentary pleasure. She was delighted when she was in oncology that she did not get to have the flowers on her bed. Strict rules against them because of unknown pests. It was easy to ask people to not send her flowers because of that rule.

I think I had about three secrets from her, and they included the euthanasia of my Doberman and her very ill cat Nina, who had kidney disease. Of course, now they are no longer secrets as she would know in spirit. I tried to tell her that soon her relatively young cat, the same age as her eight, would become a painful condition. It was heartbreaking watching her "get her Nina well" as she syringed fluid down her throat. Thankfully, I sat her down, and because we were to go away in a couple of days on a school camp and I was a parent helper, the stress of the kennels may be too much for Nina. She understood that she had seen that, so that was an experience she had scaffolding for, so I was able to relieve her beautiful cat without paining her loving heart.

Many, many lessons that child taught me.

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I might add it is very easy to see a biodynamically oriented farm from a non bio one.  If only people would realise that our soil is the most important part of farming and to learn to build it up and companion plant instead of this dreadful waste we have of monoculture.  I did a study on Monsanto in America oh were my eyes opened when I had the ability to check it out.  Now I see the same thing happening in Thailand when I went over to volunteer at a Gibbon sanctuary.  Great swathes of natural habitat bulldozed and two crops planted and all for the American market.  Corn and beans.  So sad to see the injuries on the animals, sadder to see the hundreds of years old trees and tropical vegetation bulldozed for what a meagre amount for the farmer.

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